Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' – Ballyrobert Gardens
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Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'

£6.99


About this cultivar:

Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple'  is a bushy large deciduous shrub, with rounded, deep purple leaves becoming redder in autumn. Large feathery, pink inflorescences in summer. Watch how the foliage texture and colour changes depending on the light!

    • Position: Full sun, partial shade
    • Soil: Almost any soil, grows well in Ballyrobert
    • Flowers: July, August
    • Other features: Grows well in Ballyrobert, Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit (RHS AGM)
    • Hardiness: Fully hardy - grows well in Ballyrobert!
    • Habit: Bushy
    • Foliage: Deciduous
    • Height: 300 - 450 cm (10 - 15 ft)
    • Spread: 300 - 450 cm (10 - 15 ft)
    • Time to full growth: 10 to 20 years
    • Plant type: Shrub
    • Colour: Purple, red
    • Goes well with: Baptisia, Nepeta or  Buddleia. At our garden in Ballyrobert we actually quite like to grow Crocosmia, Schizostylis, Knipofhia etc in from of Cotinus because bright red/yellow/orange flowers look great against the dark foliage. Maybe try Rudbeckia, Helenium and Helianthus?! Also try it beside other non-green foliage plants like Euphorbia griffithii 'Dixter', Acer and Chamaecyparis (Cyrpress).

      About this genus:

      Cotinus is a genus containing just two species, the Eurasian C. coggygria and the southeast US native C. obovatus that belongs to the Cashew family (Anacardiaceae). Both are used as garden plants, the more popular purple-leaved forms of Cotinus coggygria have smaller leaves and denser flower heads Cotinus obovatus (although obovatus has brighter autumn foliage in shades of yellow, apricot, and red). Both species of Cotinus have a wide variety of leaf colors and leaf forms available.

      Cotinus blooms in late summer with its airy clouds of attractive flower clusters and soon after, the autumn foliage brightens the garden. It is also popular because it is tough, easy to transplant and tolerant of a wide range of soils and situations. Although not necessary to maintain a nice shape, Cotinus responds well to heavy pruning if you are so inclined. 

      Popular pairings include a smokey theme of Baptisia, Nepeta or  Buddleia. At our garden in Ballyrobert we actually quite like to grow Crocosmia, Schizostylis, Knipofhia etc in from of Cotinus because bright red/yellow/orange flowers look great against the dark foliage. Maybe try Rudbeckia, Helenium and Helianthus?! Also try it beside other non-green foliage plants like Euphorbia griffithii 'Dixter', Acer and Chamaecyparis (Cyrpress)