Hesperantha huttonii – Ballyrobert Gardens
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Hesperantha huttonii

Hesperantha huttonii

£4.99


About this cultivar:

Hesperantha huttonii grows in Afro-montane forests where it flowers profusely, often in light shade, on cliffs, along forest roads and streams in the Eastern Cape mountains. It blooms in late summer and autumn, has pale pink flowers. A wonderful little plant, suitable for anywhere it seems.

Hesperantha huttonii was already described and the name validly published by the Kew botanist John Gilbert Baker (1834-1920). Hilliard and Burt, however, reclassified it into todays valid botanical systematics in 1982. Our version seems to grow a bit taller than the species norm! 1.5 versus 1 ft...

  • Position: Full sun, partial shade
  • Soil: Almost any soil, grows well in Ballyrobert
  • Flowers: August, September, October, November
  • Other features: Grows well in Ballyrobert
  • Hardiness: Fully hardy - grows well in Ballyrobert! H4 - Hardy through most of the UK (-10 to -5°C)
  • Habit: Clump forming
  • Foliage: Semi evergreen
  • Height: 15 - 45 cm (0.5 - 1.5 ft)
  • Spread: 15 - 45 cm (0.5 - 1.5 ft)
    • Time to full growth: 2 to 5 years
    • Plant type: Herbaceous Perennial
    • Colour: Green, pink
    • Goes well with: -

      About this genus:

      Hesperantha is a genus of flowering plants in the Iris family (Iridaceae) that used to be called Schizostylis. The genus name is derived from the Greek words hesperos, meaning "evening", and anthos, meaning "flower". 

      There are approximately 79 species, mostly native to southern Africa, but with four species reaching tropical Africa. All except one grow from corms.

      The synonym Schizostylis is widely used in horticulture for the single rhizomatous species S. coccinea, widely cultivated as a garden flower, and with numerous cultivars. The common name "Kaffir lily" is best avoided, as "kaffir" is an offensive racial term in Africa! - stick to river lily or crimson flag.

      Hardy plants with us, they like moisture but they'll grow almost anywhere that isn't a dark room or a swimming pool. They make excellent cut flowers. These semi-evergreen bulbs promise to ease the sadness that comes at summer’s end by offering a burst of fresh autumn colour - I've seen these in flower on Christmas day. My father loves the pink cutivars in autumn - I hate pink in autumn and will only tolerate red or yellow flowers! Make up your own mind!