Knautia macedonica – Ballyrobert Gardens
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Knautia macedonica

Knautia macedonica

£4.99


About this cultivar:

Knautia macedonica (previously called Scabiosa rumelica) has deep crimson, pincushion-like flowers  held high on slender, branched stems. Each flower last about two weeks but the plant produces them for months and months. Thus this popular, airy, wild-flower-ish perennial brings long-lasting colour to the garden and attracts all sorts of butterflies and bees. Don't prune the seedheads; they look great and feed the birds.

  • Position: Full sun, partial shade
  • Soil: Almost any soil, grows well in Ballyrobert
  • Flowers: July, August, September
  • Other features: Bees and Butterflies
  • Hardiness: Fully hardy - grows well in Ballyrobert
  • Habit: Clump forming
  • Foliage: Deciduous
  • Height: 60 - 90 cm (2 - 3 ft)
  • Spread: 30 - 60 cm (1 - 2 ft)
  • Time to full growth: 2 to 5 years
  • Plant type: Herbaceous Perennial
  • Colour: Green, red
  • Goes well with: Monarda, Stachys, Perovskia, Molinia, and Penstomen

    About this genus:

    Knautia (naughty-a) is a genus in the honeysuckle family (Caprifoliaceae). The common names of these flowers are a variant of "widow flower." Others are given the name "Scabious," although this word belongs to a related genus (Scabiosa).The name Knautia comes from the 17th-century German botanists, Drs. Christoph and Christian Knaut.

    Most of the cultivars we have are perennial - and they really are! (we've seen some annuals sold as perennials). They do best  in full sun but will tolerate some shade. Soil wise, almost anything that isn't waterlogged will be fine. These plants can vary in size depending on the season, so watch out - it might flop over! Never-the-less people who visit our garden just love love love this genus of plants, it really has popular appeal.

    We have a few different colours and cultivars growing around the garden and we plant them through a variety of plants like Monarda, Stachys, Perovskia, Molinia, and Penstomen. Although we also grow a few species on their own near the edge of the garden for a big, bushy, airy, wildflower-ish effect.